AGG

Volume 26, Issue 5 - September/October 2012

From the Editor
Going Global

From the shingle-style homes of the Northeast to the stucco styles of the Southwest, architectural designs, details and trends are as varied regionally as they are from individual to individual. The same goes globally. What architects create for their domestic clients can be a dramatic change compared to what they create for those located anywhere from London to Shanghai.

For this issue I spoke with architects from two of the world’s largest firms, Gensler and Skidmore Owings and Merrill. I asked them about the differences in designing for a domestic client versus an international one. They both agreed that one of the main differences is being able to adapt and understand the cultural changes. Surprisingly, it’s not just the language barrier and sometimes the dramatic time-zone changes that may first come to mind. Check out the article on page 18 and read more about what some of these global differences are and how architects can best work in international markets.

In this issue we are also preparing for glasstec, an international trade show that takes place biannually in Düsseldorf, Germany (see page 24). It is THE industry trade show for the world’s glass manufacturers and fabricators, offering all of the latest processing and fabrication equipment for everything from laminating to printing. This event will also include a special program created specifically for architects. The Architectural Congress will take place on October 24 and offer a full day’s agenda on topics ranging from climate design and architecture, the freedom of shape, human-centered architecture and more.

If you plan on attending glasstec be sure and stop by and see us. We’ll be in hall 13 stand D53 and would love to chat with you about what you’re seeing at the show, design trends, new projects as well as just what your thoughts are on global architecture. Enjoy the issue and, as always, feel free to email me at erogers@glass.com to share your thoughts on what you’ve read here or share pictures of your recently completed glass projects. AGG


Architects' Guide to Glass & Metal
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