Architects’  
F r o m t h e E d i t o r  
Guide  
TO GLASS & METAL  
Editorial  
Director  
Ellen Rogers  
Extension 118 • erogers@glass.com  
The Clear Choice  
Editor  
Nick St. Denis  
Extension 131 • nstdenis@glass.com  
Contributing  
Editor  
Tara Taffera  
Extension 113 • ttaffera@glass.com  
rom a green perspective, glass theoretically has  
a negative relationship with itself.  
Special Projects  
Editor  
Megan Headley  
Extension 114 • mheadley@glass.com  
Green building calls for less artificial lighting  
and improved occupant mood through natural  
light. That means more glass. Yet it also seeks to  
Art Director/  
Managing Editor Extension 150 • dcampbell@glass.com  
Dawn Campbell  
f
Art  
Saundra Hutchison  
minimize solar heat gain and reduce glare, which  
one would assume requires less glass.  
Daylighting versus solar control. On the sur-  
face, it seems as if one must be sacrificed for the  
other—or that they’d at least have to meet some-  
where in the middle.  
In some cases, that’s true. But through coat-  
ings developments, dynamic technology, thermal-  
ly broken systems and shading devices (among  
other things), the glass and glazing industry has  
continued to increase its presence on the wall  
while reducing many of the negative consequenc-  
es that, in the past, came with using more glass.  
We recently asked our readers, “What is  
Director  
Extension 132 • shutchison@glass.com  
Advertising  
Coordinator  
Erin Harris  
Extension 110 • eharris@glass.com  
Events  
Manager  
Tina Czar  
Extension 115 • tczar@glass.com  
Marketing  
Director  
Holly Biller  
Extension 123 • hbiller@glass.com  
Marketing  
Manager  
Kelcy Summers  
Extension 117 • ksummers@glass.com  
Customer  
Relations Mgr.  
Janeen Mulligan  
Extension 112 • jmulligan@glass.com  
Web  
Developer  
Bryan Hovey  
Extension 125 • bhovey@glass.com  
Video  
Producer  
Chris Bunn  
Extension 121 • cbunn@glass.com  
the most important ‘green’ aspect of glass and  
metal?” The poll results broke down like this:  
Publisher  
Debra A. Levy  
Extension 111 • deb@glass.com  
Nick St. Denis  
Published by Key Communications Inc.  
P.O. Box 569  
Garrisonville, VA 22463 USA  
540/720-5584; fax 540/720-5687  
Through coatings developments, dynamic  
technology, thermally broken systems and  
shading devices (among other things), the glass  
and glazing industry has continued to increase  
its presence on the wall while reducing many  
of the negative consequences that, in the past,  
came with using more glass.”  
Advertising Offices:  
Midwest  
Lisa Naugle  
Associate Publisher  
lnaugle@glass.com  
3
12/850-0899 Fax 312/277-2912  
Southeast  
Scott Rickles  
srickles@glass.com  
7
70/664-4567 Fax 770/740-1399  
Northeast,  
West Coast,  
and Canada  
Josh Lentz  
jlentz@glass.com  
360/563-4936 Fax 888/786-8777  
Europe  
Patrick Connolly  
patco@glass.com  
Daylighting—occupant health (29%)  
Daylighting—energy conservation (24%)  
Solar control—minimize solar heat gain (24%)  
Solar control—glare control (12%)  
9
9 Kings Road, Westcliff on Sea  
Essex SS0 8PH ENGLAND  
44) 1-702-477341 Fax (44) 1-702-477559  
(
Footprint—recyclability (12%)  
China and All Others Contact Publisher Directly  
It turns out there’s a pretty evenly distributed  
Debra A. Levy  
Extension 111 • deb@glass.com  
demand for green characteristics from building  
products, and glass (along with metal) has the  
ability to meet them all without much sacrifice.  
So unless the architectural and construction  
world makes a drastic 180-degree turn from  
Permissions: Material in this publication may not be reproduced  
in any format without publisher’s permission. Request for both  
print and PDF reprints should be directed to the Digital Media  
Services department, 540/720-5584; dms@glass.com.  
green-driven standards and designs, it’s pretty clear  
that glass isn’t going anywhere any time soon. AGG  
4
www.glassguides.com