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No reproduction of any type without expressed written permission.

16
Door & Window Market www.dwmmag.com
LEGISLATION
Big Changes Proposed for Energy Star
in 2019 White House Budget Plan
T
he White House released its 2019
budget proposal in February,
and the popular Energy Star pro
-
gram is once again facing big changes.
While Energy Star continues under the
2019 plan, it wouldnt be funded by
taxpayer money. Instead, the budget
seeks to authorize the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) to adminis
-
ter the program entirely through user
fees from manufacturers.
“Product manufacturers that seek
to label their products under the pro
-
gram would pay a modest fee to sup-
port EPAs work to set voluntary ener-
gy efficiency standards and to process
applications,” the budget propos
-
al reads. Additionally, the spending
plan would require the EPA to launch
a rulemaking process to determine
which products would be covered by
fees and the level of fees.
The plan proposes an upfront
appropriation of $46 million to keep
Energy Star running prior to the col
-
lection of fees.
Currently, more than 300 compa
-
nies participate in Energy Stars win-
dows, doors and skylights program.
EPA says about 80 percent of all res
-
idential windows made in the U.S.
carry the Energy Star label, and the
program also certifies commercial
buildings, new homes and industrial
facilities for energy efficiency.
The man who led the transition
team for the EPA following President
Trumps election in November 2016
sees the change as positive.
“We think these reforms are steps
in the right direction,” says Myron
Ebell, director of the Center for Energy
and Environment at the libertarian
Competitive Enterprise Institute.
“There are many similar programs
for other products, and most of these
are funded by the industries involved
and conducted by non-government
entities. We would prefer full privat
-
ization of the Energy Star program,
but changing the funding source from
taxpayers to the beneficiaries of the
program is a good reform.
Bob Maynes, director of marketing
and international sales with Mathews
Brothers, agrees.
“If we as an industry feel that
Energy Star is important (and per
-
sonally, I do not believe it is), then
WE should pay for it,” he says. “This
focuses the burden to those who ben
-
efit from it.
However, that Energy Star fee plan
worries advocates for increased ener
-
gy efficiency.
“Energy Star is an effective program
that is helping consumers and busi
-
nesses save billions of dollars in ener-
gy bills,” says Lowell Ungar, senior pol-
icy advisor with the American Council
for an Energy-Efficient Economy. To
build on its success, Energy Star needs
to maintain its independence and its
primary focus on serving consumers,
and it needs stable funding that does
not discourage manufacturers from
participating. We think the program
needs continued federal funding.
Meanwhile, the Window and Door
Manufacturers Association (WDMA)
is taking a wait-and-see approach to
the overall budget proposal.
“WDMA has been evaluating
the White Houses budget and as
in previous years, additional clari
-
fication will be needed to gauge its
full impact,” said WDMA president
and CEO Michael O’Brien. “WDMA
is specifically seeking clarification
regarding the proposal to collect
user fees from product manufac
-
turers participating in Energy Star.
While the administration stated
they would initiate a rulemaking
to implement this proposal, sever
-
al questions need to be answered
about how this would work.
As for the rest of the EPA, the pro
-
posed budget is $5.4 billion, a 34-per-
cent decrease from 2017. The plan
would eliminate several programs and
reduce the agency’s workforce.
y
Energy & Environmental
News
PEOPLE
Kateri Callahan to Depart
Alliance to Save Energy
The Alliance to Save Energy recently announced that
president Kateri Callahan is stepping down from the orga-
nization after 14 years at the helm.
Callahan will leave the organization March 31 for a
private-sector position in the efficiency field.
Callahan has been recognized by The Hill newspaper
for five consecutive years as one of Washington’s “Top
Lobbyists.” Her accomplishments include helping to win major energy-effi-
ciency provisions in the last two comprehensive energy bills as well as securing
significant federal investment in energy efficiency in the economic stimulus
bill of 2009; the creation of a regional energy efficiency organization, the
Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) and the European Alliance to Save
Energy (EU-ASE); and establishment of an international conference, EE Global.
Kateri Callahan

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© 2018 Copyright Key Media and Research All rights reserved. 
No reproduction of any type without expressed written permission.